Of the films explored in this series, 1981’s “Arthur” seems the most appropriate to remake. Starring Dudley Moore, in what would be his most iconic role, “Arthur” follows the misadventures of the titular hapless drunk whose immense fortune and desperate alcoholism has left him alone and distanced from the rest of the world.


In 2008, one of the best foreign films in recent memory was released and not only redefined the perception of horror but defied boundaries of the nature of love and the capabilities for young actors to capture convincing characters and manage innate but intimate emotion.


To remake a film, one must fight against all the images, characters, lines and scenes of the original that play in your head like a never ending carousel going ‘round and ‘round and ‘round, and create something new and hopefully just as appealing. But with so much of the magic of film lying in the realms of unexpectedness, that unidentifiable factor that evokes emotion and establishes deep-rooted connections between the characters and audience is there an art or a point to retelling a story that worked well in the first place?


Here are six soundtracks that bring emotion and connectivity to their respective films and enhance their film’s success to the infinite degree.


With Google facing court battles and legal disputes around the world and especially in Europe, it seems that anything they do results in patent issues. Rather than delay the release of Android-based devices such as smart phones, tablets, desktops, and other embedded technology, Google has taken steps to purchase the mobile wing of Motorola.


Since the start of the new millennium, when the internet really took off, movie spoilers have taken a whole new direction. With websites that employ photographers to sneak around sets and take as many pictures as they can, and camera phones that grant ordinary citizens the same power, audiences seem to want to know everything about a movie before it comes out, giving way to a comfortable theater experience that does not offer any surprises.


Louis CK is the hardest working comic in the business. After years on the road as a stand-up comedian, working gigs and honing his raw tone and sharp insight into a funnel for social satire and jabs at the ridiculous nature of culture, he has finally found the perfect outlet for his unflinching humor and surprisingly touching intellect: FX.


It wasn’t so long ago that a single year could produce more than one film that could be put on a shelf amongst the greats. The most recent example is 2007, with “No Country for Old Men” and “There Will Be Blood” standing proud as prime exhibits of creative force and the possibilities of a year in film that shines a light on more than one masterpiece. But even these seemed two amongst thousands in an otherwise standard year.


Set in the mid 19th century, “13 Assassins” follows a group of samurai warriors, a title which itself is fading in respect and necessity, who attempt to kill a sadistic Lord Naritsugu before he has a chance to take the throne and plunge the country into violence, death and despair. After Naritsugu ruthlessly kills innocent citizens, even taking to rape and dismemberment, Shinzaemon, a man well practiced in the fleeting way of the samurai, is brought in to council and eventually lead the small rebellion against the Lord’s tyrannical rule.

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